Strategies you can take during a badminton game.

in Sports by

Despite being a newbie at badminton, I often get criticized by friends and playmates alike for intellectualizing badminton training and game plays. The so called scientific method of training and game is low on the average player’s priority simply because they do not know what are its benefits and how it affects their kind of play. The lack of coaches for the common player also contribute to the slow improvement of some players despite being in the court for more than a decade. And we are not talking yet of the injuries incurred from improper training.

To top it all, the continuous surge of badminton popularity has brought in thousands of reading materials– from instructional videos to picture books, that the average player do not have enough time reading in his entire playing career! Hence, we resort to just the usual play we do day in and day out-whack shuttle cocks, pull a trick shot and deluge ourselves to winning games when in fact on the over all, our progress is so small. I am guilty of this delusion too. Often, at the expense of loosing much needed energy (and time) for my regular daily routine.

So I decided to formulate a general strategy to group and evaluate my so called badminton play. I’m no expert in this but I have yet to find a coach here in my place. So I have to “strategize” on my own for now. These strategies are generally for game plays and are intended for the average players. Of course I cannot over emphasize the importance of the basic skills and footwork in badminton but they will be tackled in my future articles.

Here it is:

Staying Alive: The very first and last form of defensive strategy vital for staying in the game. All skills and training like returning a smash to the other side of the court, is aimed at being in the game for as long as it takes.. Your main goal is to not let the shuttle cock die inside your court.

 

dive.jpeg

Staying out of trouble: Neutralize a smash and bring it to an area where your opponents couldn’t mount an attack. The important thing is you know you’re in trouble and you should make a way to get out of it as soon as possible.

 

in-trouble.jpg

Getting on the attack: Lets face it, winning in badminton usually mean a successful attack play, especially in doubles games. It is actually a transition from staying out of trouble in a game and changing the momentum to your side by pushing your proponents to be in the defensive position.This explains why a drop shot return of a powerful smash from an opponent is all too deceptive. Your opponent is forced to lift the bird and thus you go to your next strategy. Which is,

 

staying-alive.jpg

Preparing for an attack: Setting up for an attack is one of the more important but less practiced strategy in badminton. Pushing your opponents to lift the shuttle or do mid court clears for an easy attack is all that is needed. It is here also that you push your opponents to commit mistakes on the net and do net play. Here you can at times, do high clear, deep into the baseline or make several drop shots until you get the desired attack shot.

 

aviva_2005_candra_sigit_r3.jpg

Making the attack: Timing and shot selection is all that matters. For highly skilled opponents, a powerful smash is nothing , if delivered to where his areas of strength are. On the other hand, a drop shot can be as lethal if performed deceptively. If you have been succesful in deceptively putting your opponents in a defensive postion, choosing and making a successful kill will be easier.

 

badminto.jpg

And the cycle goes on. Sometimes, the smooth transition from one strategy to another will determine how fluid you are with your game and thus the success of your game play.

win.jpg

Intellectualizing your play, is not bad after all.

(Author’s Note: All picture taken from Badminton Central forum.Thank you very much!)

22 Comments

  1. Hi Doc,
    Thank you for the advice.

    “”At times my passion for the game makes me impatient for slow improvement””
    I sooooo understand that but I’m afraid it takes time and a lot of work.
    If I make it to Daveo I would like to offer to help you with your footwork or any other areas of badminton that you feel that I may be of use.

  2. Hi Doc,
    Thank you for the advice.

    “”At times my passion for the game makes me impatient for slow improvement””
    I sooooo understand that but I’m afraid it takes time and a lot of work.
    If I make it to Daveo I would like to offer to help you with your footwork or any other areas of badminton that you feel that I may be of use.

  3. Thanks too Gerry. Well, once you get the too many traffic on your site, its up to you to keep it on. Either you can get more into it or you let it die on their own (like not updating it). For now maybe I suggest you look around for a while in the blogging world and observe.

    One more thing about that Filipino time, I suggest you stick to your kind of time and instill it on your Pinoy Trainees. Base on my experience, Pinoy perform better when their being watched by a foreigner (weird as it may seem)

    I’m still stuck with the fundamental footwork routines. I tempered it with the kind of agility and stamina I have at the moment. At times my passion for the game makes me impatient for slow improvement. I’m just a year into badminton hahaha!

  4. Thanks too Gerry. Well, once you get the too many traffic on your site, its up to you to keep it on. Either you can get more into it or you let it die on their own (like not updating it). For now maybe I suggest you look around for a while in the blogging world and observe.

    One more thing about that Filipino time, I suggest you stick to your kind of time and instill it on your Pinoy Trainees. Base on my experience, Pinoy perform better when their being watched by a foreigner (weird as it may seem)

    I’m still stuck with the fundamental footwork routines. I tempered it with the kind of agility and stamina I have at the moment. At times my passion for the game makes me impatient for slow improvement. I’m just a year into badminton hahaha!

  5. Thanks for the advice regarding Filipino time. This “blog aggregator” is new to me. If you get too much traffic can you then pull out to decrease it.
    It would be interesting to hear from others but I don’t want to set myself up as an expert, I just like to share opinions.
    My blog isn’t public yet ( well as far as I know anyway) I have kept it for friends only for the moment.
    Hope your taining goes well, remember don’t put yourself under too much pressure, be patient and give yourself time. Footwork can take some time to adjust to.

  6. Thanks for the advice regarding Filipino time. This “blog aggregator” is new to me. If you get too much traffic can you then pull out to decrease it.
    It would be interesting to hear from others but I don’t want to set myself up as an expert, I just like to share opinions.
    My blog isn’t public yet ( well as far as I know anyway) I have kept it for friends only for the moment.
    Hope your taining goes well, remember don’t put yourself under too much pressure, be patient and give yourself time. Footwork can take some time to adjust to.

  7. Thanks for that link coach. I will put link to your site too.I can review you blog too if you want and this will be fed to a local blog aggregator, Davao Blogspace and will probably increase site traffic (and more questions for you). I’m not sure if you want a multitude of me firing you questions.

    If you’re referring to the “filipino time” as the habitual late comer or less time conscious, well its a common (bad) trait for Filipinos, but not all. It all depends on who are you dealing with. If the crop of trainees you got is serious about learning badminton, then they have to shape up or make their time precious during practice/training (I would). Generally, I schedule appointments an hour ahead and take all factors into consideration. Also, give the Filipinos goals to finish each time, or be productivity driven. I’m always early for an appointment, but I also make it a point i have a goal to finish for that moment (maybe a footwork or something)

    More on this later.

  8. Thanks for that link coach. I will put link to your site too.I can review you blog too if you want and this will be fed to a local blog aggregator, Davao Blogspace and will probably increase site traffic (and more questions for you). I’m not sure if you want a multitude of me firing you questions.

    If you’re referring to the “filipino time” as the habitual late comer or less time conscious, well its a common (bad) trait for Filipinos, but not all. It all depends on who are you dealing with. If the crop of trainees you got is serious about learning badminton, then they have to shape up or make their time precious during practice/training (I would). Generally, I schedule appointments an hour ahead and take all factors into consideration. Also, give the Filipinos goals to finish each time, or be productivity driven. I’m always early for an appointment, but I also make it a point i have a goal to finish for that moment (maybe a footwork or something)

    More on this later.

  9. HI Doc,
    I have put a link on my site to your blog.
    When you have time could you give me any advice regarding how to deal with “Filipino” time ?

  10. HI Doc,
    I have put a link on my site to your blog.
    When you have time could you give me any advice regarding how to deal with “Filipino” time ?

  11. Thanks again coach! Yeah, exchanging links mean I will put a link to your site on my website (called a blogroll) and you do the same with my site (if it suits your blog.

    Welcome to blogging. It will be as fun and as challenging as badminton…

  12. Thanks again coach! Yeah, exchanging links mean I will put a link to your site on my website (called a blogroll) and you do the same with my site (if it suits your blog.

    Welcome to blogging. It will be as fun and as challenging as badminton…

  13. Hi Doc,
    “”I will surely ask you many questions! Can we exchange links? “”

    Of course, forgive me as I am a newbie in blogging but am learning fast, exchange links… does that just mean that somehow we put a link to each others blog on our site ?

    I will try and answer your “flick” question later today on my blog.

    Regards
    Gerry

  14. Hi Doc,
    “”I will surely ask you many questions! Can we exchange links? “”

    Of course, forgive me as I am a newbie in blogging but am learning fast, exchange links… does that just mean that somehow we put a link to each others blog on our site ?

    I will try and answer your “flick” question later today on my blog.

    Regards
    Gerry

  15. THanks Gerry! What a pleasant surprise I got here when you visited my site! Welcome to Philippines, a country full of badminton enthusiasts!

    Strategize yes, thats logical for me. Maximize efficiency knowing age and agility limitation. Its just that here in my place we don’t have coaches to guide us better.

    I will surely ask you many questions! Can we exchange links?

    Thanks again!

  16. THanks Gerry! What a pleasant surprise I got here when you visited my site! Welcome to Philippines, a country full of badminton enthusiasts!

    Strategize yes, thats logical for me. Maximize efficiency knowing age and agility limitation. Its just that here in my place we don’t have coaches to guide us better.

    I will surely ask you many questions! Can we exchange links?

    Thanks again!

  17. Hi,
    Nice to read that you are enjoying your badminton so much that you are delving into it deeper. “So I decided to formulate a general strategy to group and evaluate my so called badminton play” This is the first step to improvement.

    I am a badminton coach that is visiting the Philippines for 7 months and if I can help you in any way with your thoughts on badminton please feel free to ask.
    After playing and coaching for 30+ years I have just started my own badminton blog and feel that I have some experience to offer.

    Regards
    Gerry

  18. Hi,
    Nice to read that you are enjoying your badminton so much that you are delving into it deeper. “So I decided to formulate a general strategy to group and evaluate my so called badminton play” This is the first step to improvement.

    I am a badminton coach that is visiting the Philippines for 7 months and if I can help you in any way with your thoughts on badminton please feel free to ask.
    After playing and coaching for 30+ years I have just started my own badminton blog and feel that I have some experience to offer.

    Regards
    Gerry

  19. I joined the badminton craze just over six months I think. Quite late for my age.I love the game and I’m addicted to it. But I also accepted that fact that I don’t have the athletic talent seen among those whom i idolize in badminton and that I’m not getting younger.

    So I read ad nauseum about badminton and I often try to apply it in my games. I don’t win that many but I’m certainly flattered by feedbacks of improvements.

    And I can save a lot of time energy and injuries if I stick to my “scientific” strategies.

    Thanks for dropping by! hope you enjoy my other badminton articles.

  20. I joined the badminton craze just over six months I think. Quite late for my age.I love the game and I’m addicted to it. But I also accepted that fact that I don’t have the athletic talent seen among those whom i idolize in badminton and that I’m not getting younger.

    So I read ad nauseum about badminton and I often try to apply it in my games. I don’t win that many but I’m certainly flattered by feedbacks of improvements.

    And I can save a lot of time energy and injuries if I stick to my “scientific” strategies.

    Thanks for dropping by! hope you enjoy my other badminton articles.

  21. How long have you been playing badminton for? You seem to have a pretty good grasp on the concepts of badminton for someone who is new to it.

  22. How long have you been playing badminton for? You seem to have a pretty good grasp on the concepts of badminton for someone who is new to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*